Multilateral Agreement Aviation

One of the first ATAs after World War II was the Bermuda Agreement, signed in 1946 by Britain and the United States. The features of this agreement have become models for the thousands of such agreements that were to follow, although in recent decades some of the traditional clauses of these agreements have been modified (or “liberalized”) in accordance with the “open skies” policy of some governments, particularly the United States. [2] In 1913, a bilateral exchange of banknotes between Germany and France was signed in the agreement probably as soon as possible[1] in order to allow airship services. IATA`s Interline Multilateral Agreements (MITAs) are an agreement in which passengers and cargo are a standard transport document (i.e.: to travel in different modes of transport involved in the route route to reach a final destination. . . .